Employment and Unemployment by Occupation 2007 9/2009
Employed Unemployed
Occupation Thousands Thousands %
Management 15,486
Business and financial operations 6,091
Computer and mathematical 3,441
Architecture and engineering 2,932
Life, physical, and social sciences 1,382
Community and social services 2,265
Legal 1,668
Education, training, and library 8,485
Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media 2,789
Healthcare practitioner and technical 7,248
Management, professional, and related 51,787 2,859 5.52
Healthcare support 3,138
Protective service 3,071
Food preparation and serving related 7,699
Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance 5,469
Personal care and service 4,760
Service 24,137 2,556 10.59
Sales and related 16,698 1,521 9.11
Office and administrative support 19,513 1,846 9.46
Sales and office 36,211 3,367 9.30
Farming, fishing, and forestry 960 156 16.25
Construction and extraction 9,535 1,605 16.83
Installation, maintenance, and repair 5,245 449 8.56
Natural resources, construction, and maintenance 15,740 2,210 14.04
Production 9,395 1,264 13.45
Transportation and material moving 8,776 1,125 12.82
Production, transportation, and material moving 18,171 2,389 13.15
Totals 146,046 13,381 9.16
2007 9/2009
Employed Unemployed
Thousands Thousands %
Notes:
1. Unemployment rates are much higher for those with less education.
2. We need to preserve and increase jobs requiring less formal education, but more apprenticeships.
3. We should not be mechanizing and computerizing most low wage jobs.
4. All who want to work should feel useful and appreciated.
5. Social well being is as important as profits.
6. The balance will require birth control and perhaps lower profits.
7. Data are from: The World Almanac 2010, pp. 109-110.